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Peanut Update

first_imgA week before Georgia’s annual Peanut Tour, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort is optimistic about the state’s peanut crop.“I think the majority of the crop is above average. I think we’re going to yield very well in the irrigated crop, which is more than 50 percent of the crop, as well as areas that got rain,” Monfort said.Monfort did add, however, that certain areas of the state have received little to no rainfall in the last two months. This lack of rain will impact the state’s overall yield.“Four weeks ago, I said we had good potential to make 4,500 pounds based upon what we were seeing at that time. I think it’s going to be a couple of hundred pounds lower because of the fact that we haven’t received that much rain in the last several weeks,” Monfort said. “You go into certain parts of the state, and we’ve been pretty stressed. Some of those areas haven’t had any rain in six weeks.”Georgia planted 780,000 acres of peanuts this year, almost 200,000 more than last year. One reason for the large increase in production is the low prices in other row crops, specifically cotton and corn. Farmers planted more peanuts than they would have normally in order to compensate for the low commodity prices. However, not sticking with crop rotations has cost some Georgia farmers who have planted peanuts in the same fields for consecutive years. Doing so increases the opportunity for disease pressure to become problematic, which has been the case this year with white mold, a disease that’s been a nuisance for Georgia farmers this year and in the past.“Where this is hitting us worse is where farmers are planting peanuts behind peanuts for multiple years, and they’re trying to reduce their fungicide applications,” Monfort said. “They either only put out so many applications or they put out the cheapest thing they could, thinking they could ease by this year. White mold is teaching us that it’s not going to work.”Monfort said farmers have already begun digging their peanuts for harvest. Due to the large amount of acres and bulk that were planted after the middle of May, harvesting peanuts could last into mid-November, said Monfort.Farmers and industry personnel will learn more about the crop from UGA Peanut Team members during the annual Georgia Peanut Tour, to be held Sept. 15-17 in southwest Georgia. The tour will be based out of Thomasville, Georgia, but will include stops in Grady and Decatur counties as well.last_img read more

Governor Wolf Asks Senator Toomey to Consider Bipartisan Concern Over Medicaid Cuts

first_img June 21, 2017 Healthcare,  Human Services,  Medicaid Expansion,  National Issues,  Press Release,  Public Health,  Seniors Harrisburg, PA – In a letter to Senator Pat Toomey, Governor Tom Wolf today highlighted his bipartisan efforts to detail the terrifying impact of drastic federal cuts to Medicaid. Sen. Toomey sits on the Senate Republican’s committee drafting the bill and has reportedly sought deeper cuts to Medicaid than the U.S. House Affordable Care Act repeal.“For hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians, Medicaid is not a handout – it is a lifeline,” Governor Wolf wrote. “It helps families care for an aging parent or a child with a disability. It is helping our state battle the opioid epidemic by diverting people from punitive criminal justice settings and into the treatment they desperately need. It allows kids with intellectual and physical disabilities to go to school and learn.“Even your Republican colleagues from neighboring states – Senators Portman and Capito – have expressed reservations with the rumored Medicaid changes that would cap Medicaid spending, shift it to a lower future growth rate, and ultimately force cuts at the state level unless state taxes are increased to cover the funding cut at the federal level. Republican governors Kasich, Sandoval and Baker, along with my Democratic colleagues, also raised a red flag over Medicaid cuts in our letter.”Read full text of the letter below. You can also view the letter on Scribd and as a PDF.Full letter:Dear Senator Toomey,I write you today in complete frustration with the process regarding health care changes in Washington. We had spoken last month, and on May 30th, per your request, I sent you a letter regarding my concerns with the approach you and your leadership, along with Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, were taking. I also offered a variety of areas of focus and issues related to health care that would actually help Pennsylvania improve and expand health care coverage to residents. I did not hear back.Regardless, last week, I sent a letter with six other bipartisan governors, including Republican governors from Ohio, Nevada and Massachusetts, asking Majority Leader McConnell to involve us in this process as ultimately we will have to implement many of these changes and deal with the terrifying reality of deep cuts to Medicaid.To my frustration, every indication appears that these bipartisan governors, along with countless health advocacy groups, patient advocates, medical professionals, hospitals, and more, will also be ignored and shut out of the Senate’s process.This is too important – too vital – for secrecy and partisanship. The current path stands to leave possibly a million Pennsylvanians without health insurance over the next decade.With your proposal about to be unveiled, I want to take this moment to talk about Medicaid.  For hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians, Medicaid is not a handout – it is a lifeline. It helps families care for an aging parent or a child with a disability. It is helping our state battle the opioid epidemic by diverting people from punitive criminal justice settings and into the treatment they desperately need. It allows kids with intellectual and physical disabilities to go to school and learn.Even your Republican colleagues from neighboring states – Senators Portman and Capito – have expressed reservations with the rumored Medicaid changes that would cap Medicaid spending, shift it to a lower future growth rate, and ultimately force cuts at the state level unless state taxes are increased to cover the funding cut at the federal level. Republican Governors Kasich, Sandoval and Baker, along with my Democratic colleagues, also raised a red flag over Medicaid cuts in our letter.Unfortunately, press reports indicate you have advocated for Medicaid cuts to go even further than the House. Even worse, statements from your office have seemingly sought to confuse your constituents about this issue. Saying that these changes won’t make anyone ineligible for Medicaid is disingenuous and does not reflect the budgetary reality of covering these populations should you choose to cut federal funding for your state, which you know faces legacy financial challenges.Under Medicaid cuts in the House proposal, Pennsylvania will be forced to either significantly scale back the health care programs we currently offer to vulnerable residents, such as seniors and individuals with disabilities, or will be forced to weigh decisions about who to cover against other critical state funding obligations, including education, infrastructure, and the environment.Worse for older Pennsylvanians, the House bill charges older Pennsylvanians an “age tax” of up to five times what younger Pennsylvanians will pay. For low-income seniors currently receiving income-based tax credits, this, on top of Medicaid cuts, will be especially devastating.I ask you to join me and Republican governors and Senators to support a more open, bipartisan and intellectually honest debate about the future of health care in this country. Any debate about health care should be about how we cover more people, not less.I extend to you and your staff an open invitation to have an honest, in-depth conversation about how your approach to Medicaid would hurt Pennsylvania’s state budget, and, more importantly, the people who need lifesaving care. I will make myself available to your schedule.Thank you,Tom WolfGovernorGovernor Letter to Pat Toomey by Governor Tom Wolf on Scribd Governor Wolf Asks Senator Toomey to Consider Bipartisan Concern Over Medicaid Cutscenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more