Month: June 2021

Race for Magners League play-off spots

first_img• Almost 700,000 fans through the gates in 16 rounds• a league record gate of 50,645 for the Leinster v Munster game• on target to top more than one million fans by the Grand Final on 28 MayBROADCAST• 120 out of 134 matches being show live.• matches shown on Terrestrial TV in Scotland, Ireland and Wales.• a 10% growth in viewing figures in Wales with weekly averages of 254,750INTERNET• on-line audiences of more than 900,000 unique users per month across the Magners League and club websites LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS ON FIELD• Leinster and Ulster reached the quarter-finals of the Heineken Cup and Munster the quarter-finals of the Amlin Challenge Cupcenter_img Leading the way: James Coughlan goes flying in Munster’s recent win over AironiTHE RACE to to make the Magners League play-off places is hotting up with just six rounds to go.Munster are leading the charge for a home draw in the play-offs, with a nine-point lead at the top of the table over defending champions the Ospreys – but there are only six points separating the next five teams in the battle for the next three places.There are two Heineken Cup quarter-finalists in the chasing pack – Leinster and Ulster – last season’s Amlin Challenge Cup winners Cardiff Blues and the Scarlets.So there is all to play for as the season reaches its climax and Ospreys skipper Alun Wyn Jones says his side are in no mood to give up their title.Aiming for the top: Ospreys captain Alun Wyn Jones“Right from the start of our season we declared we wanted to become the first team to win the Magners League title back-to-back and the bonus point win over Connacht last weekend really made a difference and moved us nicely into second place,” says Jones.“The Grand Final win over Leinster in Dublin last year defined our season and after our exit from the Heineken Cup all our efforts will be going into retaining the title in May. Our strength in depth was questioned last season, but the team has held up well during the RBS 6 Nations.“It would be great to have a home tie in the play-offs, but getting into the top four is the first priority and we believe we can go anywhere and win. The Grand Final concept certainly added to the appeal of the Magners League last season and everyone is now gearing up for a big push between now and 28 May.”Magners League chairman Andy Irvine has also been impressed by the growth of the tournament this season and says: “We know we have an excellent, expanding product and it is great to see more and more people engaging with it. Some of the world’s biggest names are playing in the Magners League and the level of competition on the pitch continues to rise.”The headline figures highlighted by Irvine included:GATES• despite the difficult economic climate, attendance figures have remained constant on a game for game basis and show a 30% increase with the addition of the two Italian teams.last_img read more

Olympics 2016: How ongoing crises in Brazil are affecting rugby sevens

first_img With the protracted political unrest in Brazil stretching into April, the Zika virus still considered a “public health emergency” by the World Health Organisation and delayed works on infrastructure for the 2016 Olympic Games causing concerns, you may be wondering how rugby sevens will be affected.Brazil is currently struggling through a recession, while president Dilma Rouseff is facing impeachment over alleged practises to hide the true deficit in the nation’s budget – a process made all the more dicey as a number of individuals in Brazil’s ruling caste are implicated in the nation’s biggest ever scandal, with corruption at state-run oil company Petrobras. The Zika virus, which is linked with shrunken brains in children, is passed on by mosquitos and has caused some panic in Brazil.With such a backdrop, Rugby World spoke to World Rugby’s head of operations and performance, Mark Egan, to find out how, if at all, the political climate in the region will affect the delivery of sevens at Olympics 2016.In the field: a shot of the rugby pitch at the Deodoro Park where rugby will be played during Olympics 2016RW: It must be difficult, with financial and political issues in Brazil, to get everything you’d like done in time for Rio 2016. Where are you currently with planning?Mark Egan: “There are some concerns but we’re confident everything will be delivered on time. The ongoing political stuff, a lot of that is outwith our control so we’re just trying to get on with it. There are certainly challenges and it’s been widely reported that a number of venues are behind schedule. Ours is behind schedule, but it’s a temporary venue so it can still be built in time but we are running late. We have weekly conference calls and site visits now and then, so we know with current time frames the seating bowl will be delivered on time – albeit running late, into the end of June. We hoped to be finished by the end of May. So that leaves less time for contingency planning.“There’s still transport infrastructure being completed so there are risks with some of that. What we can control and can influence, we’re working very hard in putting a lot of pressure on and we’ve got a very good working relationship with the Rio 2016 people. They are trying to do their very best as well, but a lot of the funding is controlled by the federal government and the city (of Rio). So when you’re not actually in control of your own budget, delivering your own event, it’s difficult. You just have to keep pushing and pushing.”RW: But it must be hard to talk to the right people at a time like this?ME: “We obviously deal with the organising committee and we can speak to them any time. Our chairman has picked the phone up to the mayor (of Rio) and has spoken to him directly. That was a number of months ago when we were very concerned about the field being ready for our recent test event.“We met with the mayor last June – I was there with Bernard Lapasset and Brett Gosper – and the mayor wrote his mobile number down on a piece of paper and gave it to Bernard and said: ‘Call me any time you need to.’ When we were getting quite worried, Bernard called him and things happened. I’m not saying he’s answering his phone every day now! We can also speak to the very top people in the International Olympic Committee and Kit McConnell, our former colleague, is now head of their sports department and we have contact with the right people who can make decisions on our behalf.” Testing times: Brazil women celebrate winning the test event at Rio’s Deodoro Park LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS South American rivals: Argentina and Colombia prepare to square off at the test eventRW: You mentioned the test event, with the South American women’s championship being played at the Deodoro site, where the Games will host sevens. You also had concerns about the field there, but it was eventually available on time. What are the concerns at the site now?ME: “There were some concerns about the (‘village’ on the Deodoro site). We had all the summer’s international federations with the IOC and Rio 2016 about six weeks ago and they presented plans for the common domain areas at Deodoro Park which weren’t very satisfactory to all and we made our points very clear that this is an Olympic park so it needs to have services and facilities that are commensurate with that status. They’ve taken that on board and issued some new plans recently that are much better. So there will be plenty of concessions to buy drinks, to buy a hot dog. Inside the venue there will be food stalls but it was outside, in the common domain areas where they were looking to save budget but we said: ‘No, you’ve got to prioritise that.’“They understand what our requirements are and our first priority is to get everything right for the athletes. So that’s the field of play, the warm-up areas, the training venues, the athlete lounge, the medical facilities and services. They are our key priority and we’re pushing hard on those and feel comfortable we’ll have that in place.“One advantage of our schedule is that, although it is over six days, each day is in two sessions so there is breathing space between sessions. So there will be plenty of time to make adjustments, fix the grass, let it settle overnight etc. We’ve brought in our own grass consultant to work with them and provide advice so we’re confident that will be fine.”Pressing issue: In February the organising committee raised concerns over ZikaRW: Speaking of health, planning with the Zika virus still prevalent in Brazil must be difficult for all involved in the Olympics?ME: “We went through a lot of that ourselves, with the test event in Sao Paulo in February, so we are well aware of what the risks are there as well as the precautions people need to take. We issued a whole set of guidelines to participating teams. We’re following the WHO advice on this as well. Now obviously the risk at the time of year the Olympics are on in August is not peak summer, when it’s hot and humid and offers the right conditions for mosquitos to breed, but they are also doing a lot of mitigating work at the venues to make sure there’s no stagnant water etc. “The Zika virus is what it is, and it’s up to every individual athlete to make the choice of whether they feel it’s safe to go but the advice we’re getting at the moment from the WHO and all the major health bodies is that it is safe to go if you take the right precautions, and we are providing all that advice to the teams as are their national Olympic committees.”For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

The greatest full-backs of all time: Ken Scotland

first_imgKen Scotland spearheaded the attacking full-back movement, and in doing so, is recognised as one of the greatest of all time The playmaker was slight, even by past standards, and softly spoken. However, he was a dedicated tackler. His Test career was cut short as he moved to the North-East of Scotland but restrictions meant he couldn’t play for the region’s strongest FP clubs, so he had to join lowly, ‘open’ Aberdeenshire.It may sound like his playing career faded, but Scotland was a man who inspired past greats and paved the way for the more adventurous 15s of the modern age. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Major Teams: Army, Heriot’s FP, Cambridge University, London Scottish, LeicesterCountry: ScotlandTest span: 1957-65Scotland caps: 27 (27 starts)Lions caps: 5 (5 starts)Test points: 79 (8C, 16P, 5DG)In 1959 Ken Scotland took a ball on the run, as part of a pre-planned Lions move, and caught New Zealand completely off-guard. This wasn’t meant to happen but somehow this scotsman was doing things differently.The tourist showed the fallibility of the All Blacks that year, despite losing the series 3-1, and the locals named Scotland as one of five standout tourists. He played at scrum-half, fly-half and centre on that tour, but it was his play from full-back that caused the Kiwi writer Terry McLean to remark: “He floated like summer down through the New Zealand defence.”Scotland changed full-back play forever. Gone were the rules, with the Scot prepared to attack from the back, picking lines rather than waiting to counter-attack; staging raids on enemy territory rather than hoofing the pill away. And he could kick off both feet too. He made place-kicking with the instep of the foot glamorous, when before it was considered ridiculous. An all-round athlete, he also received one cap for Scotland at cricket. TAGS: The Greatest Players Ken Scotland It’s hard to fathom now, with his name lost amidst a sea of greats, but the classier players of the age adored the effortless abandon of Scotland’s play. At the time of his 50th Irish cap, Tom Kiernan was asked who the finest player of his generation was. Instantly he replied: “Ken Scotland. It was a privilege to be on the same field as he was.”last_img read more

Thomas Savare had Stade Francais’ best interests at heart

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Yes, it was clumsily, even brutally, enacted but wasn’t the merger of Stade Francais and Racing 92 the best for both clubs in the long-term? Evidently not for the players and supporters of Stade, who whipped up such a reaction that they ultimately forced Jacky Lorenzetti and Thomas Savare to back down.Hip hip hooray, and power to the people!It’s just a shame so many of Stade’s supporters haven’t been bothered to attend matches in recent seasons. Take the 2013-14 campaign, for example, when Stade’s average home gate was 17,000, the sixth best in Europe, a figure that had plummeted to 11,577 in 2015-16 (18th best in Europe). And this during an era when they won the Top 14 title and hosted Champions Cup matches for the first time in six years.Indeed, when Stade won the Top 14 in 2015 barely 1,000 fans bothered to attend the official presentation of the trophy, compared to the 50,000 Toulon supporters who had hailed their heroes 12 months earlier on the Côte d’Azur.In the past 24 hours there has been much talk of ‘tradition’ winning out, but tradition isn’t always a positive. It can also constrain, halt progress that, while painful in the short-term, is necessary in the long-term. Look at Biarritz and Bayonne, two famous old clubs who almost merged in the summer of 2015. That again was put paid to by people power. The result? Bayonne are bottom of the Top 14 and Biarritz are enjoying their third season in the ProD2.Knocked back: Bayonne have really struggled in this year’s Top 14One can understand the reaction of the Stade players to last week’s announcement. Nobody likes to learn they could soon be out of a job but the fact is most would have soon found gainful employment elsewhere. And what of the role of Pascal Pape, the self-appointed players’ spokesman, who was allegedly the driving force behind the strike? He’s given the club a decade of good service but he retires at the end of this season. As Midi Olympique wondered last week, was his involvement inspired by his devotion to Stade Francais or the fact he’s a vice-president of the FFR?The FFR was against the merger although the cynic may have wondered if their opposition didn’t grow stronger when they learned that the LNR was broadly supportive. There is a power struggle going on in French rugby at the moment and the feeling in some quarters is that the merger was an issue over which the two factions could flex their muscles.To an outsider, the past week has encapsulated much of what is wrong with France in general, why the country’s economy is moribund and why millions of its brightest and most innovative brains live in London, New York and San Francisco. The French are resistant to change, it scares them, particularly when it involves a break with tradition. Even more so when it’s a cold, hard business decision. How unscrupulous. How vulgar. How Anglo-Saxon. A lonely figure: Thomas Savare has tried many means to give Stade a viable future Tense relations: Is Bernard Laporte’s FFR at war with LNR?In the end Savare and Lorenzetti, two men who have funnelled millions of their own money into their respective clubs, decided the insults and aggravation weren’t worth the effort and walked away from the merger. Who can blame them? In a professional sport why deal with amateurs.Lorenzetti will have to mend fences with players and staff but he’s still got his spanking new stadium to look forward to, and a strong business model to boot. Not so Savare. It’s said he has set a deadline of three months to sell the club otherwise he will petition for bankruptcy, six years after he stepped in to save Stade Francais from such a fate.But who would want to buy the club? No one, according to Savare. “In six years I haven’t received one credible offer,” he said recently. It’s hardly surprising.First there is a deficit believed to be €8m; then there’s the prospect of two top-flight rugby clubs (five miles apart as of next season) competing for the attention of the notoriously indifferent Parisian public, and then there’s the fact that the club doesn’t own its own stadium or its training facilities, both of which are the property of the Paris city council. As L’Equipe put it, a club is worth only what it possesses. In Stade’s case that’s just a name.No wonder Savare is desperate to get shot of the club, and no wonder either for the angry tone he struck in an interview in Monday’s edition of Le Parisien, the capital’s daily newspaper. “I remain convinced that it’s the best project, the one which makes most sense in the long-term,” he said, although he admitted mistakes had been made in its initial presentation. Nonetheless, he said, he believed the real mistake has been in the strength of opposition that forced the abandonment of the merger.Public display: Stade’s Sergio Parisse wears a pink wrist band during the final Six Nations matchSaying he believed the players had been “manipulated”, Savare added that the merger had fallen victim to the current in-fighting within the French game. “We presented this project in a very complex context, in a climate of rivalry between the FFR and the LNR. Frankly, it’s intolerable.”Savare didn’t convey an air of optimism for the future of Stade Francais, and nor did he exude much positivity about the sport as a whole. “French rugby is living beyond its means,” he said. “Everyone has to realise it. We’re on an intravenous drip.” Savare tried to resurrect Stade Francais with an infusion of capital six years ago, but that didn’t work; last week he tried an infusion of hard-nosed pragmatism but that also failed. The result? Stade Francais’ life support machine could soon be switched off.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Professional rugby reaches Hawaii

first_img“I want to do something that’s never been done before,” Kilgour tells Rugby World of the ambitious plans. “The MLR is not a retirement home, it’s not for the old guys who are asking for $300,000, it’s for the young guys who deserve a shot.“We’ve just seen in the Last Dance (documentary series), the NBA wasn’t big until Michael Jordan showed up, So why not in rugby? Hawaii is full of Michael Jordans – the Pacific is full of Michael Jordans or Jonah Lomus, so why don’t we find that Michael Jordan and be the Chicago Bulls of rugby in the States and just take it to the next level?“There’s most definitely untapped potential in Hawaii. If you get the right people on board. You need to have Mick Byrne, the best skills coach in the world. You have to have Tamati Ellison, one of the up-and-coming backs coaches in New Zealand. You have to have that calibre and knowledge to be able to upskill and tap that talent.“It’s not just a matter of making a team and saying it’s going to happen, you’ve got to put in the resources and the effort. And that’s why some American teams have struggled. They think, ‘There’s a lot of Islanders in Utah, we’re going to carve up.’“You’ve got to have the right people who are going to create culture, going to create the skill level. And that’s another thing for the Islands too.“You’ve got to have the right environments and you’ve got to have the right coaching staff. It’s something that’s missing.”Involved: Former all Black tighthead John Afoa, now with Bristol (Getty Images)The talent drain from the Pacific and the region’s Test teams struggling to secure access to their athletes who play on the other side of the world are two major talking points.According to Kilgour, this group want their players to represent the Island nations, adding: “If they want to play for Tonga, Samoa and Fiji we are going to support them. A lot of European teams make it difficult for an Islander to play for their nation. We are willing to pay them for their time away. We are willing to pay them during a tour of the UK or pay them while there’s a three-Test series in New Zealand for Fiji. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS At the heart of all of this, they say, is representing Hawaii. And the group will need to be canny about finding the right price point for tickets and merchandise. Securing favourable television rights, drawing investors, it’s not easy. Kilgour sees the recent success of the Tongan rugby league side as a positive signifier, adding that one of the best things about this region is that “Pacific Islanders support Pacific Islanders”.The group will start slow and small. They will begin in a 10,000-seater stadium for a few years before planning to go into the University of Hawaii’s Aloha Stadium, home to the renowned Rainbow Warriors college football team and with a capacity of 50,000. And the promotion of Hawaiian players will be a touchstone.Related: The opportunities and the obstacles for Pacific Islands rugbySo what of the next big steps, then? Kilgour, a Kiwi who has also worked with the Cook Islands national set-up, explains: “We’ve got the right people and the right knowledge. And we’ve reached out to a lot of Hawaiians – that was the first thing we did, to ensure we get the community on board, get interest from the players.“We want Hawaiians to play for us. We want the current, contracted MLR Hawaiians to be playing for us. We want them to come home. There’s about seven or eight, but whether or not we get them is another thing – there’s all sorts of rules and regulations about who you can approach and talk to. But if MLR really want the game to grow, they will let the Hawaiians come back and play for Hawaii.Eventual home: The Aloha Stadium (Getty Images)“But Hawaii has a very good club system. And their high school rugby is very successful. The playing numbers are good and there is a long history of playing rugby in Hawaii.“We’re not competing against American Football. Rugby is a lot safer and there are a lot more opportunities for women in rugby. So we aren’t competing against anybody else. Our ticket prices are going to be cheap, affordable, because the team is for the people, it’s for the community.Related: Is this the most beautiful rugby ground in the world?“We want our home games sold out and we want all our home games in Hawaii. We want to make sure that our public get to see our players playing at home. And that’s why it’s important we get so many of those Hawaiian players playing for us. It just makes sense.“One of the key players we’re looking at is Hawaiian. He would be a marquee player. He’s more important to us than a Dan Carter or a Jonny Wilkinson. Because those two aren’t going to sell out stadiums, they aren’t going to sell us memberships. This one Hawaiian player is going to do that. It’s important we get Hawaiians back playing in Hawaii.”The side will have similar kit colourings as the famous Raiders in the NFL and plan to do their own pre-game challenge, like a haka or Sipi Tau. They want to be an intimidating team to play. But before all of that, they want to represent their region and its people. Professional rugby reaches HawaiiRugby has now got a new destination in the Pacific. Kanaloa Hawaii Rugby have been awarded a licence to complete in the USA’s Major League Rugby from February 2021.While the MLR continues to expand – and there are strong rumours that a team in Florida is in the offing too – this move is seen by the leadership at Kanaloa Hawaii as one that can also offer greater opportunities for Pasifika and Maori talent.Known as the Mercury Group, the club’s ownership includes former All Blacks Anthony Tuitavake, Ben Atiga, Jerome Kaino, Joe Rokocoko and John Afoa. Tracy Atiga is the group’s CEO (and the MLR’s first female CEO) and Cam Kilgour is the rugby manager.The team have also brought in Mick Byrne to be head coach. The Australian, who was skills coach as the All Blacks won two Rugby World Cups, will be assisted by former centre Tamati Ellison. The ex-Hurricanes, Highlanders and Rebels man has four All Blacks caps to his name.Related: Why there needs to be a Pacific Islands Super Rugby teamAnd as well as achieving an MLR license, the new franchise are also interested in exploring options to be a neutral base for any Pacific Island side in the mooted trans-Tasman club competition. However, according to Kilgour, who also helped set up the LA Giltinis – the new franchise in Los Angeles, reaching MLR was the first goal, with growing Pacific and Hawaiian rugby the bigger picture. A group of familiar faces from New Zelaand rugby are at the vanguard of MLR’s next big expansion, with Kanaloa Hawaii Rugbycenter_img “That’s the difference. We’re going to be the first-ever professional Pacific Island rugby team. We’re going to get behind our Pacific Island players and support them.” Team branding (Kanaloa Hawaii Rugby) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Las personas de fe llamadas a ser activistas del medioambiente

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 24, 2012 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Las personas de fe llamadas a ser activistas del medioambiente Un panel de Utah explora el encuentro de la pobreza y ecología. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Bonnie Anderson, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, hace una intervención durante el programa “Encuentro de la pobreza y el medioambiente”, una transmisión en directo por Internet desde la catedral episcopal de San Marcos en Salt Lake City, Utah. Entre los oyentes se encuentran, a la izquierda, George Handley, profesor de humanidades en la Universidad de Brigham Young, y Forrest Cuch, director ejecutivo de Ute Tribal Enterprises. ENS, Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City, Utah] Los participantes en el programa de la Iglesia Episcopal “El encuentro de la pobreza y el medioambiente”, que tuvo lugar el 21 de abril, convinieron en que las personas de fe pueden y deben desempeñar un papel importante en enseñar a las comunidades a ser buenos vecinos y mayordomos de la creación.“En las tradiciones religiosas abrahámicas, la pobreza confronta el sueño divino de la abundancia: de un banquete celestial en una tierra de paz con justicia”, dijo la obispa primada, Katharine Jefferts Schori, en sus palabras de presentación.“Los anticuerpos de la pobreza comienzan a formarse cuando los miembros de la comunidad descubren que su común humanidad y dignidad son interdependientes”, dijo ella, instando a las personas a comenzar por “optar por advertir y hacer algo respecto a la pobreza en nuestro medio”.El programa de dos horas de duración fue transmitido en directo vía Internet desde la catedral de San Marcos [St Mark’s Cathedral], de la diócesis de Utah, en Salt Lake City. Las estadísticas mostraron que 700 computadoras recibieron la transmisión; por lo menos 50 de esas computadoras fueron usadas por grupos que vieron la transmisión. La sesión estará disponible a solicitud y contará con un manual del facilitador y con materiales para optimizar la recepción y la participación. El texto de las palabras de Jefferts Schori se hará público cuando la versión por encargo de la transmisión esté disponible.de PBS, a la derecha, hace una pregunta durante el programa “Encuentro de la pobreza y el medioambiente”. El evento de dos horas de duración se transmitió en directo vía Internet desde la catedral episcopal de San Marcos en Salt Lake City, Utah. ENS, Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg.”]El evento, que tuvo lugar el día antes del Día de la Tierra, constó de dos paneles moderados por Kim Lawton del noticiero semanal de ética y religión [Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly] de PBS.Durante el primer debate sobre la pregunta de si las iniciativas de sostenibilidad pueden sacar a las personas de la pobreza, Bonnie Anderson, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, les recordaba a los oyentes que la gente de fe cuenta con la unidad de propósito que es fundamental para organizar la comunidad. “Contamos con la unidad de la regla de amar a nuestro prójimo como a nosotros mismos”, dijo. “El problema es que no conocemos muy bien a nuestros prójimos”.Forrest Cuch, director ejecutivo de Ute Tribal Enterprises, dijo a los participantes que “lo que más nos perturba es que toda esta degradación [ambiental] ha causado muchísimo daño a nuestra gente hasta el grado de la desesperanza”. Él definió esa desesperanza como “nuestro problema más amenazante” y dijo que los líderes tribales están tratando de ayudar a su gente a reconectarse con las creencias tradicionales.“Les estamos recordando lo que alguna vez fueron”, agregó. “Mi pueblo proviene de hermosas partes de este país… éramos un pueblo muy feliz, muy sano y éramos un pueblo que se autosostenía”, y estábamos “profundamente conectados con la tierra”.George Handley, profesor de humanidades de la Universidad de Brigham Young, dijo durante el mismo debate que la religión ha sido históricamente un obstáculo para la mayordomía medioambiental, pero “cada tradición religiosa tiene principios sagrados que viviéramos a su altura y nos adhiriéramos a ellos serían de gran beneficio para la tierra”. Él sugirió que la adhesión individual y colectiva a esos principios, así como una labor que trascienda las fronteras ecuménicas e interreligiosas, tales como la del foro del 21 de abril, “desatan una enorme cantidad de energía espiritual”.Handley dijo anteriormente que había encontrado “un misterioso obstáculo teológico” que impedían a las personas prestarle atención a asuntos tales como las fuentes de energía alternativa. Algunas personas le han dicho que les parecería una ingratitud hacia Dios si no usaran para su beneficio los dones de Dios del petróleo y el gas [natural].“Simplemente me gustaría señalarle a la gente que el sol mismo es un don de Dios, el viento, la energía geotérmica -estas son extraordinarias fuentes de energía que pertenecen también a la misma categoría de dones de la creación”, afirmó. “No creo que ninguna teología sea responsable si no nos acordamos de nuestra propia responsabilidad de ser creativos y de hacer ajustes cuando nos damos cuenta que lo que hacíamos ya ha dejado realmente de funcionar”.Durante el segundo panel sobre el problema de reducir las consecuencias de la salud ambiental para los que se encuentran en la pobreza, el Dr. Gerry Hardison, director del hospital de la Misión Maseno en Kenia, y misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal, instó a los participantes a asumir una visión a largo plazo en defensa del medio ambiente. Dijo que la cuestión es si “vamos a invertir en el mundo después de nuestra muerte o no”.“Es una inversión que significa sacrificio; los dividendos son enormes, pero ustedes no van a verlos personalmente”, dijo, provocando un aplauso.El Rdo. Michael Livingston, director de la Iniciativa de la Pobreza del Consejo Nacional de Iglesias, dijo que las personas de fe “se ven confrontadas por esta tajante demanda de actuar con la mayor responsabilidad hacia la creación de Dios”.Cecilia Calvo, coordinadora del proyecto de justicia medioambiental de la Conferencia de Obispos Católicos [Romanos] de EE.UU., expresó su acuerdo con este punto al decir “esto no es radical, esto no es nuevo para nosotros. El cuidado de la creación de Dios comenzó con el Génesis.“Para nosotros como pueblo de fe ésta es una parte esencial de quienes somos. Es algo sencillo”, apuntó. “No es algo nuevo; no es una moda pasajera”.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es editora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

They’ll be home for …Fourth Advent

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis December 18, 2013 at 11:49 am Blessings to all the people of All Saints. What a beautiful Christmas present. Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Barbara Cavin says: Rector Albany, NY The Rev John Hartman says: December 17, 2013 at 5:32 pm Neil, what terrific news that your church has been repaired!!!Wonderful for you and for everyone at church.I have not forgotten our wonderful conversations at the CREDO week.Prayers and Blessings, Barb Cavin+ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bruce Rockwell says: December 26, 2013 at 11:51 am What a blessing to read of the All Saints’ renewal! All Saints’, Bay Head, supported me with a tuition grant while I was in seminary at General in 1983. Neil’s leadership of All Saints’ while ‘in exile’ has been a model of inspiration. Thank you for this “Good News” story and update! Barbara Tuzio says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 17, 2013 F WILLIAM THEWALT says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT December 21, 2013 at 12:10 am This is a beautifully and accurately written article. Thank you so very much. As a longtime member of All Saints Church and president of its Women’s Guild, I am very excited about returning to our sacred space and spiritual home. The weekend services will be glorious ! God bless us all. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments (6) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The members of All Saints Episcopal Church in Bay Head, New Jersey, will be back home in their church on Dec. 21 for the first time since Hurricane Sandy severely damaged the building and grounds on Oct. 29, 2012. Parishioners strung lights on the pine tree to the right of the sign and hosted “A Festival of Light” the evening of Nov. 30 as a sign to the community that they would soon return. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] After more than a year in exile, the members of All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Bay Head, New Jersey, will be home for Christmas.In fact, the parishioners of the church that Hurricane Sandy swamped on Oct. 29, 2012, will be home for the Fourth Sunday of Advent.All Saints’ doors will open again on Dec. 21 with a “Service of Light.” The following day, the parish will celebrate its first Sunday Eucharist in the church since Sandy. Diocese of New Jersey Bishop William Stokes will re-consecrate the sanctuary and church’s memorial garden.It will be a “very, very emotional” two days, the Rev. Neil Turton, All Saints rector, predicted.“But, as I’ve been warning them in a number of sermons I’ve recently delivered, we are not going back in the way that we were when we left,” he told Episcopal News Service in a recent interview. “It is going to be very different. Do not expect to be what we were because of the circumstances that have changed and shaped us over these last 15 months.”The 124-year-old church sits three blocks from the ocean and just feet from Scow Ditch, a tidal waterway. Sandy caused close to $4 million in damage to the church and rectory as it drove water toward the church from both the Atlantic and Barnegat Bay. And All Saints is surrounded by still-devastated homes along a stretch of the Jersey Shore where some blocks are still mostly deserted and where, on other stretches, builders toil to restore the communities from Sandy’s body blows.“It’s renewal,” said Mark Durham, who lives a few yards south of the church, of All Saints imminent return. He and his family have been back in their house since January, but it’s been a lonely year as few of their neighbors have returned.The Rev. Neil Turton, rector of All Saints Episcopal Church in Bay Head, New Jersey, stands near the church’s original baptismal font, which, because it is anchored into the ground below the building, helped hold the entire structure in place during Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News ServiceBay Head and neighboring Mantoloking to the south sit together on a narrow strip of land between Barnegat Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. They were two of the area towns among the hardest hit by Sandy. A 130-year-old rock seawall is thought to have made the difference between homes being inundated in Bay Head and ripped apart in Mantoloking.Eighty-eight percent of Bay Head’s oceanfront homes were flooded but only one was destroyed, one report said In Mantoloking the ocean breached the barrier spit in three places, destroyed 60 homes, making 137 uninhabitable and damaging another 383, according to information here.The magnitude of damage has “left a deep scar and we will also be shaped by that,” Turton said, adding that there are psychological scars as well.There is “a great deal of frustration, anger because after 15 months a lot of people are still suffering,” he said. “It’s as though time has moved on but it seems time has stood still in terms of insurance companies, government” and the way those entities’ policies and procedures has at times hampered the Shore’s restoration.But, Turton said, “the faith community has remained incredibly strong.”That strength comes despite the fact that the congregation is smaller than it was before Sandy struck. Some people have still not come home to the Jersey Shore. Some snowbirds never came back from Florida this past spring. “A lot of people have walked away,” he said, noting a trend happening up and down the Jersey Shore and elsewhere in Sandy’s wake.Turton said the parish’s pre-Sandy average Sunday attendance was 168; since Sandy the figure is “a shade under 100.” All Saints congregation has spent these long months worshipping at 12:15 p.m. on Sundays at St. Mary’s by the Sea Episcopal Church in Point Pleasant Beach, about two miles to the north. St. Mary’s also offered refuge in the form or meals and other supplies to hundreds of storm victims beginning the morning after Sandy cleared out.“It’s given us a very hands-on concept of what it means to be part of a diocesan family in a way we would never normally understand,” Turton said of the parish’s time at St. Mary’s. “It’s different from going to a diocesan meeting with people. We have actually lived and breathed with these people, shared worship, shared meals, shared stories.”Still, it wasn’t home. And the 12:15 p.m. worship time was a tough sell for some folks, especially young, busy families. “It’s no disrespect to St. Mary’s,” Turton said. “They have been wonderful but, we have been in exile. We have been in a foreign land.”Often, when he has been asked to introduce himself at meeting over these months, the rector responds: “My name is Neil Turton and I am from All Saints in Exile”And now that exile is about to end. Parts of the office area, primarily Turton’s office, still need finishing but the church itself was nearly put back to rights when ENS visited Dec. 10. The restored organ was due back any day and the pulpit’s placement awaited arrival of the sound system. The pews still need book racks and cushions.Those were some of the last items on what has been a long punch list of needed work that began soon after Sandy’s waters – waist-high or higher by the looks of the debris lines it left – receded. Not all of the damage was apparent at first, said John Tym, a local builder who completed five years of restoration work on the church days before Sandy struck.As Tym and a colleague walked through Bay Head after the storm to check on their customers’ properties, their first reaction was relief when they saw the church still standing at the corner of Lake Avenue and Howe Street. A few days later they entered the church and sensed a six-inch pitch to the floor as they walked up the aisle. Then they noticed that the walls of the sanctuary were pulling in as they walked.The Rev. Neil Turton, rector of All Saints Episcopal Church in Bay Head, New Jersey, shows how high Hurricane Sandy’s storm surge rose in his office at the back of the church. Water from tidal Scow Ditch, just feet from the windows, scoured a huge hole under the church and inundated the office area and parish hall. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News ServiceThe cause was a water-filled eight-10-foot wide hole under the floor. The storm surge had scoured out nearly eight feet of the ground around the church’s red-brick pilings. The underside of the floor had never been attached to those pilings, thus, had it not been for the more modern foundations under the attached Bristol Hall on one side and the 1950s-era narthex on the other, the church would have been washed away, Tym said.And if a preacher ever needed a homecoming sermon illustration here it is: the other anchor that probably saved the church was the baptismal font in the narthex whose concrete base goes through the floor and into the ground.The parish’s Facebook page has a photo gallery showing the immediate post-Sandy state of the church building and the rectory, and the initial clean-up, here.With the help of Church Insurance, whose concern and work Turton called “brilliant,” a disaster-restoration company came to the church within days of the storm to dry the inside of the building while work began on repairing and raising the Scow Ditch bulkhead by two feet. That latter project was being funded by $50,000 in insurance money and a parishioner’s gift of stock that would add another $30,000, according to Turton.Then, thousands of gallons of water had to be pumped from underneath the church. Tym oversaw the sinking of close to 100 helical piles into the ground below the building to retrofit the rudimentary foundation. The church has since been tied to those piles. Sump pumps are in place as well.The church floor had to be ripped up and the floor beams replaced. All utilities needed to be replaced. The office area and the interior of the parish hall and its kitchen needed to be gutted and redone.The entire exterior had been re-shingled over the previous five years or so and Tym had just decided to take down the last of the exterior pipe scaffolding right before the storm. Then he was faced with the choice of pulling the interior walls apart to get at wet insulation or tearing off those new cedar shake shingles. Tym had to leave when the shingles were stripped from the building because he said he just couldn’t watch.Water from tidal Scow Ditch, which runs along the back of All Saints Episcopal Church in Bay Head, New Jersey, did the most damage to the 124-year-old property, including wreaking havoc in the memorial garden. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News ServiceColin Walsh, whose company C.M. Walsh Pipe Organs of Philadelphia was restoring the water-damaged organ, told Tym that they could help him with other cabinetry needs. When it became clear that the majority of the pews, which were all original to the building, could not be salvaged, Tym asked Walsh to make new pews. The only trouble, he said, was that the first prototype “looked too nice” and Tym feared the pews would look out of place in the restored nave. Walsh worked with Tym to get the stain to look old enough, according to the builder.Wood from the original pews was later milled into wainscoting for the parish hall and office wing. And other salvaged lumber was crafted into an altar for the hall for more informal services. Tym said they added LED light bulbs and other energy-efficiency upgrade.“We’ve got a 21st century church in a 19th century context,” Turton said.Painter Erika Martinez puts the finishing touches on the interior of cabinets in the office work area at All Saints Episcopal Church in Bay Head, New Jersey. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News ServiceChurch Insurance covered all but $200,000 of the work on the church, according to the rector and Tym, and the parish has raised about $70,000 of that amount thus far. The insurance settlement came after some negotiation but Turton insisted, “I can’t praise them too highly” for the way the company worked with them.Sandy also flooded the near-by rectory to the point where it needed to be razed. Construction began earlier this month on a new rectory, with Church Insurance covering the $500,000 replacement cost. However, Turton and his wife, Wendy, will not be living in the new rectory. The couple has moved four times since being displaced by Sandy and can’t face a fifth move, he said.While “one or two people” questioned the need to construct a rectory in that case, Turton said the parish must build for the future. “No one appointed here [as the next rector] will be able to afford a house in Bay Head,” he said.Meanwhile, assuming the rectory is completed by next summer, the parish can let it out in the lucrative summer-rental market for “a princely sum,” he predicted.But, for now, summer is far way and winter is just coming on. The Dec. 21 Service of Light celebrating All Saints’ long-expected homecoming will begin just about six hours after the winter solstice. As parishioners and friends head into the longest night of the year, they will no doubt be remembering that other long night – the one when Sandy hit the Shore.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Timothy Kimbrough says: Advent They’ll be home for …Fourth Advent Severely damaged by Hurricane Sandy, ‘All Saints in Exile’ set to return December 18, 2013 at 11:21 am What wonderful news, Neil. I too remember the week spent with you at CREDO and thank God that you and the congregation are now to be back in the church building after it was ravaged by Hurricane Sandy. December 17, 2013 at 4:48 pm I have a wonderful memory of preaching at All Saints’ in 2008 when I served as the Director of Church Relations for Seamen’s Church Institute in NYC. I’m overjoyed that this vibrant church will be returning home next week, if only I could join in the homecoming. Blessings to Father Turton and it’s parishioners. Thanks be to God. Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

Fornaro named interim president and dean of Episcopal Divinity School

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service [Episcopal Divinity School press release] The Rev. Francis Fornaro has been named interim president and dean of Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The announcement was made during a March 23 community Eucharist in St. John’s Memorial Chapel by EDS Trustee the Rev. Warren Radke.“I am honored to be called to serve an institution that has done so much to form and prepare me for a career in ministry — as it has for so many others,” said Fornaro. “I look forward to working with students, faculty, staff, trustees, alumni/ae, and supporters of EDS as together we help our school fulfill its purpose of preparing lay and ordained leaders for Christ’s church and the world.”The Very Rev. Dr. James A. Kowalski, EDS Board of Trustees chair, issued a statement informing the school community of Fornaro’s appointment, writing: “Please join me in welcoming the Rev. Fornaro in this new role, and on behalf of the Board of Trustees, offer our prayers for his leadership as we successfully pursue the mission of EDS during a period of transition. We are deeply grateful as we take these next steps, confident that we will continue to be enlivened by theologies of liberation and live up to our role as a respected and progressive center for study and spiritual formation.”Fornaro’s appointment as interim president and dean begins immediately.Fornaro brings nearly two decades of experience as an ordained leader in The Episcopal Church, including serving as adjunct faculty member at EDS and as a former member of the CREDO faculty where he provided spiritual guidance and support for clergy from diverse parishes across the country. Fornaro’s first career was as a teacher and administrator in the Boston Public Schools. He holds a BS in Education, an MEd in Administration and Organization, and an MDiv from EDS with concentration in Pastoral Theology. Featured Jobs & Calls People, Theological Education Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Mar 24, 2015 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Fornaro named interim president and dean of Episcopal Divinity School Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Kansas church repents treatment of its only black member

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Joe Woodyard says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ann Fontaine says: Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group William James Coley says: October 17, 2015 at 9:48 pm This is a thoroughly interesting article. Thank you for including it. Thank you also to Mr. Beck for following the various leads in Clay Center in order to write the history of such a remarkable woman. I am sure that there are many more like her. I am touched by the care and desire of the current congregation to not only to honor Elizabeth Mai DeKonza, but to make public its reconcilation. As others have stated, there is still much work to do to battle and conquer racism. September 30, 2015 at 8:03 pm Thank you for this amazing story. It is one step on a journey of miles we need to take as The Episcopal Church as we confront institutional racism. I am heartened by the dedication St. Paul’s Clay Center showed to marking this repentance and remembrance. I would love to read the 19-page history. Is there a way to access it? By Melodie WoermanPosted Sep 30, 2015 October 2, 2015 at 4:52 pm If you send me your email, I’d be happy to send those to you. You can find my email address on the website of the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas, http://www.episcopal-ks.org. David Veal says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Claire S. Milligan says: Melodie Woerman says: Carl Cunningham says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Rt. Rev. Joel Marcus Johnson, Ret’d. says: October 18, 2015 at 9:02 pm I attend All Souls Memorial Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. This article brought tears of joy and excitment that God’s redeeming grace never, never, never stops. THIS is a beautiful article because it reveals the outcome of faithfulness to and reliance on a God who’s love, mercy, and justice is boundless and eternal as expressed in and through: 1) Mai DeKonza, 2) Jim Beck, and 3) St. Paul’s congregation. Ms. DeKonza’s strength to endure 59 years of exclusion is testimony of her strength of character. I do not know if I could or would have put up with mistreatment for fifty-nine years and still have believed that God loved me. Yet, like St. Paul, of whom the parish honors, Ms. Dekonza is a living example of God’s declaration in 2 Corinthians 12:7-10, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness,” and Paul’s declarative response, “Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknessess, so that Christ’s power may rest on me.”Mr. Beck reminds me of the High Priest Hilkiah ordered by King Josiah to repair the Temple and who found, according to 2 Kings: 22, the book of the law that spurned the king to reform worship in his land. Mr. Beck’s tenacity and faithfulness in searching out the truth and then presenting it to the congregation is wonderful.And finally, the response of St. Paul’s congregation mirrors that of King Josiah’s response “when the king had heard the words of the book of the law, that he rent his clothes.” The congregation did not respond with an, “Oh, that’s the past.” No, they sought to rectify a great wrong with repentence. I wish more would be willing to do as this wonderful congregation did. You all like King Josiah will be honored by our God. This congregation has done the three things God requires 1) do justice, 2) love kindness, and 3 walk humbly with their God. Thank you for shining God’s light into this world.Sincerely,Will Coley Nancy Mott says: October 2, 2015 at 10:00 pm Amen to Rita Wallace. “Repentance requires more than a ceremony.” Certainly this parish has done something that is, sadly, most uncommon. The church I belong to, a Black African American Episcopal church, began because Episcopal African American children could not be baptized in the city’s White Episcopal churches. Diligent historical search followed by repentance is an important place to begin. Yet the most hopeful note in the story lies in the next-to-the-last paragraph: “the opportunity and responsibility to better understand systemic racism and other forms of oppression”. That’s an opportunity and responsibility of us all. October 5, 2015 at 11:51 pm This is the story of many African Americans in the United States. My family was introduced to the Episcopal Church in the mid-1800’s during slavery in Alabama. My great great grandmother, father was a white Episcopalian. This story is so painful to read because it just reminds me how harsh and evil people can be and still sit in a church and think it is okay and nobody speaks out against the evil. My family never departed from the Episcopal Church. The Episcopal Church has taught me to be the best Christian possible through outreach, the glorious liturgy, and the awesome parties. LOL!!! I love my church. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 September 30, 2015 at 5:00 pm In a literal sense, no one is a “cradle” Episcopalian, or any other kind of Christian, since one becomes a Christian at baptism, not by birth. However, I grew up in an integrated Anglo-Catholic parish in the 1950s and ’60s where many of the Black families proudly identified themselves as “cradle,” and indeed their families had lived in this country many more generations than mine had and been members of the Episcopal Church much longer. The same pertains to some Native Americans, whose ancestors were Anglican since before the American Revolution. The Oneida Nation brought the Episcopal Church to Wisconsin. So one ought not to generalize about terms like “cradle.” The same goes for the Anglo-Catholic tradition, which is as much a part of the complex strain that makes up Anglicanism as any other. Generalizations are, in themselves, a form of pre-judgement in which we distance ourselves from one or another group or the representative of that group, as was so unfortunately done to Mai DeKonza. She stands as a Christlike witness, one who persevered, loving her Church and parish despite rejection as our Lord did. Rita Wallace says: Phoebe Pettingell says: Helen Svoboda-Barber says: Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel October 1, 2015 at 10:20 am This sad story shows the depth of racism, North and South, in America. It is not just history. It exists today. In addition to public acknowledgement of past sins we need present, determined actions to cleanse the soul of the nation from the virus of racial prejudice. Rector Albany, NY October 1, 2015 at 5:44 pm When I encounter stories like these, my question is, “In what way am I still doing this?” Because racism continues even now, I urge gentle but honest self-examination followed by confession. Many falsely believe that they are tolerant; That they do not sin. So did Peter in Matthew 26:35– “Peter said to him, ‘Even though I must die with you, I will not deny you.’ And so said all the disciples.” But Peter did deny Him, as do we around this issue. I pray that all who come out of denial are warmly embraced. Today, as we experience less interpersonal racism, we suddenly realize that racism has been woven into the policies and practices of our organizations and institutions. Institutionalized racism is racially-biased outcomes without the racists. Examples include mass incarceration driven by racially-biased law enforcement, or school dropout rates driven by racially-biased rates of discipline or healthcare disparities or underemployment or the wealth gap. Statistics are consistently showing that all of our institutions have very racially-biased and negative outcomes. With this service of repentance, a church confronted its own institutionalized racism. Finally, internalized racism is just coming onto our radar. Any tendency toward self-hatred or low self-esteem is magnified by racism. There are many black Episcopalians who are struggling to hold their heads up today because their own churches do not see them as equal members. All of these forms of racism, which is our collective sinfulness, must be healed in order for all of us to fulfill the Great Commission. My prayer continues to be …O God, you have bound us together in a common life. Help us, in the midst of our struggles for justice and truth, to confront one another without hatred or bitterness, and to work together with mutual forbearance and respect; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen Ellen Tracy says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA September 30, 2015 at 5:56 pm My husband’s family went to St Pauls, Clay Center. By the time I was visiting there in the late ’90’s they were supporting marriage equality and had turned quite rational. This sort of sad behavior was probably not unique. Bless them for their atonement. October 2, 2015 at 4:57 pm This rural area of Kansas has very few African Americans living in it. That is true in much of the state. Fewer than 6 percent of our residents are African-American, mostly living in urban areas. And the people of St. Paul’s today are open-hearted, progressive and welcoming. Though small in number, they are committed to providing food for people in need, their primary ministry. October 4, 2015 at 7:55 am The 19 page story of the life of Mai DeKonza is posted on our church’s Website: http://www.episcopalclaycenter.org. Thank you for your interest. Rector Bath, NC Haley Smith says: Jim Beck says: Melodie Woerman says: October 6, 2015 at 12:15 am Dear Bro Hicks,I am an African American, baby Episcopalian. I believe your heart is in the right place. But I have a strikingly different perspective on many of your reflections. Here is just one example: “There are many black Episcopalians who are struggling to hold their heads up today because their own churches do not see them as equal members.” THIS IS SIMPLY NOT TRUE. In the spirit of Ms. Mai, we are not “struggling to hold our heads up.” I wish we could discuss others of your comments, to include:“Today, as we experience less interpersonal racism…”“…we suddenly !! (Emphasis mine) realize that racism has been woven into…”“Institutionalized racism is racially-biased outcomes without the racists.”“Finally, internalized racism is just coming onto our radar.”“Any tendency toward self-hatred or low self-esteem is magnified by racism.”“All of these forms of racism, which is our collective sinfulness, must be healed in order for all of us to fulfill the Great Commission.”Bro. Hicks. Racism, white skin privilege, can be very subtle. Allow me to make two suggestions: please watch the documentary film, TRACES OF THE TRADE. And, please take our church’s course: SEEING THE FACE OF GOD IN EACH OTHER (also known as the “anti-racism” training). September 30, 2015 at 6:50 pm The most remarkable thing to me about this story is the perseverance of this amazing Christian. How many people I have talked to who have left the church over a slight or grievance, and Ms. DeKonza stayed with it. Blessings to her for all that she can teach us. Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Rev. Blaine Hammond says: WJoe Hicks says: Rex Botengan says: center_img Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC September 30, 2015 at 11:41 am If this had happened to Bp Curry’s mother — he would probably not be an Episcopalian. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET December 11, 2016 at 8:40 am A better description for Episcopalians is to be called “A Cradle Baptized Christian” TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Kansas church repents treatment of its only black member September 30, 2015 at 9:53 pm What a wonderful event and story, and Elizabeth such an inspiring person who did not desert her church. In Easton MD, our Talbot County Association of Clergy and Laity (TACL) is sponsoring our first Conversation on Race, an event which will continue to reshape itself in the years ahead. It includes inter-congregational Sunday suppers in our churches, synagogue and mosque, as well as Community Conversation Days for such professional categories as the justice system, secondary and higher education, medical delivery of service, the business community, and even our religious congregations. It is important for our spiritual leaders to respond to Dr. King’s challenge, that 11 o’clock Sunday morning is the most segregated hour in America. This issue is looming large for us as TACL has forged a deeper relationship with NAACP in such events as the King Day Breakfast, now adding educational events for young and old alike. More to the point, Elizabeth, St. Paul’s Clay City and Wards Chapel AME’s story will be shared among our planners. Thank you for this inspiring story. Comments (25) Submit a Job Listing October 1, 2015 at 12:15 am As acatholic I am familiar with the term cradle catholic, which refers to someone born into a catholic family and baptized as a baby. I unaware of any other meaning for Catholics. I am not a cradle catholic as I converted in my late teens. I haven’t never heard it used in any other referrnce than birth or convert. Perhaps episcopalians use it differently. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Racial Justice & Reconciliation The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group October 12, 2015 at 4:24 am As a third generation Episcopalian and therefore cradle Episcopalian, I find the term merely descriptive. I was baptized in the Philippine Episcopal Church when it was still part of TEC (then PECUSA). My grandparents remember the missionaries who seeded the Church in the Philippines, including Charles Henry Brent (whose feast day is March 27th). I find it odd that so many find this term oppressive. At what point should I deny the rich heritage that belongs to me? And how does my history “piss off” other who do not share it? Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books October 1, 2015 at 7:42 pm What is astounding to me is that she is still called the church’s ‘only black member’. There have been none since? There are none now? Hmmm… I suppose, given how she was treated, it should not be surprising that other black people didn’t feel drawn. (I probably wouldn’t go to that church myself now, being black.) I think repentance requires more than a ceremony, though. They should be actively working for racial reconciliation and racial justice in the here and now. There is work crying out to be done. October 1, 2015 at 1:50 am I would like to see the words of the hymn she wrote. Our choir sings a hymn with the music to “Finlandia”; that tune can never be used enough. September 30, 2015 at 8:17 pm I’m glad you don’t like people who prejudge others. As a “Cradle Episcopalian” I am none of the things you describe nor were my parents or grandparents. But thanks for the blanket assessment. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL robert Hunter says: Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Althea Benton says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Susan Kay Miller says: Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Lynne Hatter says: Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA October 1, 2015 at 3:39 am Can’t help but think of Deacon Joe Thompson and how this would have made him feel. Knowing him, he would have driven to Clay Center from the cathedral to attend. Rector Collierville, TN October 2, 2015 at 11:39 am I worshiped at this church for 7 1/2 years before moving away in 2009. I loved that place and I love those people. I’m thankful that we’re still trying to get it right. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Members of St. Paul’s and guests gather at the grave of Mai DeKonza for the blessing and dedication of a stone on her previously unmarked grave, 56 years after her death. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Diocese of Kansas[Episcopal Diocese of Kansas] On a recent Sunday afternoon, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Clay Center, Kansas, was packed with worshippers, including half a dozen guests from the Ward Chapel AME Church in nearby Junction City.They had gathered Sept. 20 for a service of repentance, healing and reconciliation to acknowledge the mistreatment of the only African-American member in the church’s 134-year history, Mai DeKonza, who died in 1959.Over and over again, the people prayed, “Forgive us our sins. Forgive us our sins. Forgive us our sins.”DeKonza, who was confirmed in 1900 in the small church in north-central Kansas, was a poet, musician, playwright and prolific letter writer who mostly was ignored by her fellow church members during her 59-year membership. Her separation from them was even more complete by their use of a designated chalice to administer communion only to her.Parishioners and guests sing a hymn that was written by Mai DeKonza during the service of repentance. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Diocese of KansasNow, to help give her a voice in the church that she didn’t have in life, the service included excerpts from letters she had written to Bishop James Wise, the fourth bishop of Kansas who served from 1916 to 1939, as well as a hymn she wrote that had been arranged by parish organist Sandra Carlson to the tune Finlandia.And when it came time for communion, the only chalice on the altar was the one that had been reserved for DeKonza.In her sermon, the Rev. Lavonne Seifert, the church’s priest-in-charge, said that the service was to address twofold sorrow. “Today, we express our sorrow for the actions and inactions of those good Christian people who worshipped in the era of ‘Jim Crow church,’ as Mai described it,” Seifert said. “But I am most sorry that those who came before us missed the opportunity to really know Mai DeKonza and to hear her wisdom, benefit from her insights and enjoy her company.”Kansas Bishop Dean Wolfe sent remarks that were included in the worship bulletin: “Today, let us repent of the sins of prejudice and racism and strive to be the inviting, loving people God has called us to be. Today let us say ‘thank you’ to a woman we did not know, yet who is teaching us still, long after she has joined the saints in light.”Hazel Washington, an African-American woman who was among those who came from the AME church in Junction City, said she thought the service “brought a lot of healing.” She added, “I felt God here.”DeKonza: Musician, poet, committed Episcopalian The church’s attitude toward DeKonza had been acknowledged in a history written for the parish’s centennial in 1981. That account called the church’s treatment of her “a blot on the glorious history of St. Paul’s” and noted that for years “she was tolerated but not accepted.”Hazel Washington lays flowers at the grave of Mai DeKonza. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Diocese of KansasBut the depth of this alienation, and the talents DeKonza possessed, remained hidden until Jim Beck and his wife Ginny moved to Clay Center when they retired in 2013. After he read the 1981 account, he said his background in psychology – he holds a doctorate in the subject – prompted him to ask, “How did this happen?”With a college degree in history and research experience honed through a hobby in genealogy, he began to dig. He found information in the local museum and census records, as well as in the archives of the Diocese of Kansas.Beck learned that DeKonza was born in 1870, the daughter of a white man from England and a black woman who was freed from slavery by being brought into free-state Kansas from Missouri by Union General and U.S. Senator James Lane.Her given name was Elizabeth May Lawton, and when she was 21 she legally changed her last name to DeKonza, an acknowledgment of her beloved home state. It isn’t known when she started to use Mai, an adaptation of her middle name, as her first name.As a child DeKonza contracted typhoid fever that left her disabled and required the use of crutches to walk. Although she had only an eighth-grade education, she worked as a music teacher, stenographer, seamstress and light housekeeper.She also composed and performed music, and wrote poetry and dramas, some of which were published. She gave speeches and lectures about race, and she became active in politics, including support of Prohibition.Later in life she mostly was homebound after being run over by a car.St. Paul’s, Clay Center, placed this marker on the grave of Mai DeKonza, the only black member in the church’s history, as a mark of repentance for her lack of acceptance by the congregation during her life. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Diocese of KansasBeck wasn’t able to learn what drew DeKonza to The Episcopal Church, but in the diocesan archives he found what he called a treasure trove of 20 letters from DeKonza to Bishop Wise, and copies of some letters from him to her. In those letters “she described her own experiences,” Beck said. “They were like a diary.”In them she shared the depth of her commitment to her faith and The Episcopal Church, in spite of her treatment by fellow parishioners.On April 11, 1934, she wrote to Wise that in spite of her sense of alienation from the church, she had tried to attend Easter service, making the 11-block walk on her crutches. She discovered that the church had changed the service time from 8 a.m. to 6 a.m., and she arrived just as people were finishing breakfast.She wrote, “And I thought, as I saw them enjoying themselves so merrily, Easter morning, that if the church had requested them to make up an Easter box for African heathen, how gladly they would have given to it; but nobody in St. Paul’s thought of me, of the African race, right at hand, with an Easter egg, or card, or message of cheer, nor of suggesting that a bite of their fine Easter breakfast be sent to me. They simply forgot me.”Later, when she heard that all black Episcopalians might be put under the jurisdiction of Rt. Rev. Edward Demby, suffragan bishop for colored work, she said she simply would not comply; she was sticking with the bishop of Kansas. He had been a pastor to her when her local clergy had not.She wrote, “Please let me stress this fact, dear Bishop, that all the Bishops in the Episcopal Church, of the entire American continent, backed by all the Bishops of the Church of England, could not have the power to change me from Bishop Wise to Bishop Demby. I am small and weak in body, but have you ever seen my spirit?”Beck also learned that when she died in 1959, her funeral took place at a local mortuary, not at St. Paul’s, and she was buried in an unmarked grave in the paupers’ section of the local cemetery.Making amends through repentance and a gravestoneIt took Beck about six months to complete his research and compile it into what became a 19-page history. When members of the congregation read it, they knew they had to do something. They needed to make amends of some kind for how the church – their beloved church – had treated DeKonza. And they had to get a marker on her grave.Seifert suggested they have a service to publicly acknowledge St. Paul’s poor treatment of its only black member.Carolyn Garwood, the church’ senior warden, said it was painful to learn the depth of DeKonza’s story. A lifelong member of the parish, Garwood realized her grandmother would have been a contemporary of DeKonza’s. “My grandmother was pretty accepting – at least I thought she was – and taught us to respect people who were disabled,” Garwood said. “I learned tolerance from her. I would hope that she would have been accepting of Mai. It scares me because I know all these people who I wouldn’t have expected to ignore her. It upsets me.”The Rev. Lavonne Seifert, St. Paul’s priest-in-charge, consecrates wine in a chalice that previously had been set apart for use solely by Mai DeKonza. At the service of repentance, the entire congregation received communion from it. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Diocese of KansasBeck wondered what had happened to the chalice reserved for DeKonza’s use. After some searching, two old chalices turned up in the church basement. He then turned to the Rev. Frank Holtz, retired priest at St. John’s in nearby Abilene, for help. Holtz had grown up at St. Paul’s and as a teenager had been the church’s sexton. He told Beck that he once had asked about a chalice he saw in the basement and was told, “That’s for the colored lady.” Beck took both old chalices to Abilene, and Holtz pointed out the one he remembered.Seifert said she knew that in the service she was planning, that chalice would be the only one used.Church members also donated money toward a marker for her grave, and a committee worked with the local monument company to create a design. It includes the outline of a chalice, with an Episcopal shield forming its bowl. It is surrounded by ivy, which the monument company told them was a symbol of strength.Seifert received permission from the Diocese of Southern Virginia to adapt the diocese’s service of repentance for slavery. The service in Clay Center was called a “Service of Repentance, Healing and Reconciliation” and featured a variety of hymns and music with the theme of reconciliation, including “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” a hymn of longing and deep meaning for the African-American community.After the service, most of the 75 worshippers caravanned to the local cemetery to dedicate the new marker on DeKonza’s grave and place flowers around its base.“You can’t heal something that hasn’t been revealed”Heidi J. Kim, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s missioner for racial reconciliation, said that St. Paul’s efforts show that its members understand what reconciliation means. “The people of St. Paul’s have said, ‘This is a wound, and we are going to try to find out what happened.’ ”(The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business, and carries out mission.)Taking an honest look at its history gave St. Paul’s the chance to experience “a mutuality of repentance and healing,” Kim said. “You can’t heal something that hasn’t been revealed.”She said that the depth of love current members have for their church gave rise to their sense of pain and grief that the same love wasn’t extended to DeKonza.Kim said that since she had learned what St. Paul’s has done, she has shared the story with others in The Episcopal Church, “and everyone I have told has been moved to tears,” she said. “This is remarkable, and I can’t wait to hold it up churchwide.”Retired Bishop Nathan Baxter of Central Pennsylvania, honorary chair of the board of directors of the Union of Black Episcopalians, said in an e-mail that what the people of St. Paul’s did was “an incredible story of grace.” He said that as bishop he’d heard about an occasional black member in small, scattered communities, but few people, including him, had stopped to ask about their stories.He said St. Paul’s work to uncover the truth about its relationship to DeKonza shows “that it is never too late to heal our conscious or unconscious histories with truth, confession and heartfelt acts of corporate penance.” Such efforts, he said, “when blessed by sincerity, can become a liberating witness of Christian grace for us, and for the world around us.”A start, not an endGarwood, St. Pauls’ senior warden, called the Sept. 20 service an important start, but it can’t be the end. “We have to keep this going,” she said, “and encourage other parishes to tell their stories. This can’t just go on the back burner. We have to keep the momentum going.”Beck said that his research into DeKonza’s life makes it pertinent for him and his fellow parishioners to find out “who are the Mai DeKonzas of 2015 who live in Clay Center but who have been brushed off.” He wondered what actions undertaken by people today will cause similar embarrassment to their community in 50 years.In her sermon, Seifert said the church now has the opportunity and responsibility to better understand systemic racism and other forms of oppression that leave people with a sense of hopelessness. “This is the time,” she said, “to rededicate ourselves to noticing, caring for and walking with the Mai DeKonzas we meet here and now.”Washington, of the Junction City AME church, said she would like to see congregations of different people come together, perhaps around Thanksgiving. She said more opportunities to share across racial lines should happen “not to right a wrong, but because it is right.”– Melodie Woerman is director of communications for the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas. October 1, 2015 at 8:16 am Well said, Phoebe! Thanks. As you know, most “Cradle Episcopalians” in the South are staunchly Protestant “Low Churchmen,”…”Virginia Churchmen” as we used to say. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Kathleen Kuczynski says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

Un ministère d’inhumation des « saints innocents » dans une église de…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] Lorsque le révérend Joshua Case et un petit groupe de paroissiens de l’église épiscopale des Saints Innocents inclinent la tête pour prier alors qu’ils enterrent certaines des plus jeunes victimes de la violence à Atlanta, ils le font souvent seuls.Dans certains cas, des membres de la famille sont présents à l’enterrement. D’autres fois, ils ne sont pas là. Soit ils sont absents, soit ils n’ont pas de moyen de transport jusqu’au cimetière ou bien ils sont incarcérés ou encore l’État leur interdit d’être présents.Mais l’enfant n’est pas oublié. Pendant ce bref service solennel, Joshua Case et les autres deviennent la famille « en deuil » de l’enfant.Depuis avril, Joshua Case a effectué seize de ces services au cimetière de Lakeside Memorial Gardens. Ces enterrements ne représentent qu’une petite partie des quelque 300 enterrements célébrés tous les ans et financés par le programme d’enterrements pour indigents du Comté de Fulton. Le nombre total de décès d’enfants en Géorgie – plusieurs centaines chaque année, selon le chiffre officiel – est encore plus effrayant et la détresse de ces victimes a inspiré à l’église des Saints Innocents de concentrer ses efforts d’entraide sur les enfants victimes de violence afin d’honorer sa mission à long terme et son nom.Alors qu’il continuait d’en savoir plus sur les jeunes victimes de Géorgie, Joshua Case a rencontré le révérend Cliff Dawkins, l’aumônier qui supervise les enterrements d’indigents du Comté de Fulton. Joshua Case a été stupéfait d’apprendre que les enterrements d’enfants se déroulaient souvent sans aucune famille ni aucun témoin autres que Cliff Dawkins et le personnel du cimetière.« Ma première réponse a été : pas dans mon comté », nous rapporte Joshua Case.Cliff Dawkins a invité Joshua Case à présider les enterrements des enfants et un petit groupe de l’église des Saints Innocents s’est formé pour accompagner Joshua Case lors de ces services.Article complet en anglais. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Un ministère d’inhumation des « saints innocents » dans une église de Géorgie Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL de David PaulsenPosted Oct 20, 2016 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more